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Industry Catches Up, Sort Of

In March 2003, I blogged:

How about a branding program for non-detector triggering clothing and accessories? Some sort of clothing industry council could work on it with the Department of Homeland Security. "FlyReady," maybe, or "WalkOn." There would be a logo associated with it. Clothing and accessories bearing the logo would be certified to have been tested using DHS metal detection equipment and found not to set it off. Shoes could use highly durable plastics as reinforcement.
From Roland Piquepaille's Technology Trends a few days ago:
I'm almost certain that some of you experimented some problems at security counters before boarding a plane. You were asked to remove your shoes or your belt -- while your laptop was left unattended on the other side of the counter. How frustrating! But I have some good news for you. In "Functional Fashion Helps Some Through Airport Checkpoints," the Washington Post (free registration) reports these incidents are now so frequent that retailers are offering new products -- such as bras and shoes -- labeled as 'airport friendly.' In fact, a Google search on the 'airport friendly' subject returns more than 22,000 results! Read more on this 'fashion trend'...

Here is a general introduction from the Washington Post.

In this era of tightened airport security, retailers are coming to the aid of the aggravated traveler, offering new products -- such as bras and shoes -- designed to get passengers through the checkpoints without the indignity of a pat-down.

Shoemakers Johnston & Murphy, Florsheim and Rockport sell dozens of styles without metal shanks in the soles and market them to frequent fliers. Florsheim identifies the styles with tags that look like passports labeled "airport friendly" inside the shoebox.

A good start. Now, set up an industry-wide certification, get DHS buy-in, brand it, and you're all set. See? That wasn't so hard.

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